Apple’s statement on iPhone throttling

Via Apple:

We’ve always wanted our customers to be able to use their iPhones as long as possible. We’re proud that Apple products are known for their durability, and for holding their value longer than our competitors’ devices.

To address our customers’ concerns, to recognize their loyalty and to regain the trust of anyone who may have doubted Apple’s intentions, we’ve decided to take the following steps:

• Apple is reducing the price of an out-of-warranty iPhone battery replacement by $50 — from $79 to $29 — for anyone with an iPhone 6 or later whose battery needs to be replaced, starting in late January and available worldwide through December 2018. Details will be provided soon on apple.com.

• Early in 2018, we will issue an iOS software update with new features that give users more visibility into the health of their iPhone’s battery, so they can see for themselves if its condition is affecting performance.

• As always, our team is working on ways to make the user experience even better, including improving how we manage performance and avoid unexpected shutdowns as batteries age.

I’ve gone back and forth on this for a couple days now but Apple’s response has really cleared things up in my mind.

Apple should have been very clear about this practice of throttling performance based on battery health from the start. The fact that they neglected to mention it during any of the WWDC or iPhone events makes it seem all the more sinister. However, if you know Apple at all, you know that certainly wasn’t their intention.

Yesterday’s statement, some of which you can see above, was fantastic. Not only did they explain what and why this was occurring but they went above and beyond by dropping the repair charge on a battery and pledging to provide clearer indications of a phone’s battery condition. This is a huge win for people who felt let down by what they considered a shady move by Apple.

In the future, I hope that the company takes a more transparent approach when adding features like this that were clearly intended to add to a user’s experience, not sabotage it.

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